Warm Water Fishes

Warm Fishes

Many fish species that live in coral reefs can be seen at Oceanário de Lisboa, one of the world’s largest aquariums. Coral reefs constitute the habitat of about 25% of all marine species.

Lined Surgeonfish
The Lined Surgeonfish is an intensely territorial and extremely aggressive fish that inhabits coral reefs that are subject to the erosion of waves. It can live until 42 years of age
Palette Surgeonfish
It has one or more pairs of sharp caudal spines, which are connected to venom glands this fish uses for both attack and defense. This species became popular because of the cherished character Dory from the Pixar film “Finding Nemo”
Clown Anemonefish
The members of this species begin their lives as males but, if the dominant female of the group dies, one of the males can change its sex in order to take her place
Red Lionfish
Native Species of the Indo-Pacific region, the Red Lionfish was accidentally introduced to the Atlantic Ocean where it became an invading species. It is also common in the Gulf of Mexico
Picassofish
The Picassofish lives in coral reefs and lagoons up to four metres deep, near sandy bottoms and loose rocks. There it spends the day combing for sustenance, blowing water jets that dislodge the sand and expose its prey. This species has the facility to swim forward, backward and hover above the reef
Copperband Butterflyfish
The Copperband Butterflyfish lives either in solitude or in pairs, in coral reefs or in estuaries rich in nourishing algae. This species has a black spot on the posterior area of its body, misleading predators that mistake the spot for an eye. Consequently, when attacked, the Copperband Butterflyfish can flee in the opposite direction
Chinese Trumpetfish
Easily identifiable due to its elongated body and tubular nose, the Chinese Trumpetfish has small spines in its dorsal fins and exhibits a rather variable colouration from brown or green to yellow. It’s a solitary and unobtrusive fish that inhabits shallow waters, usually associated with rocky and coral reefs
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