What a Waste

Editorial: What a Waste

A change is needed – a structural one. If the most pessimistic predictions for the near future – in terms of degradation of the environment and the ecosystems, coupled with the forecasts for a rampant growth of the world population – are correct, then the concept of “sustainability” itself is under transformation.

Whether you believe God created the world we live in or you follow the scientists’ claim that Earth started to take shape over 4.6 billion years ago from a cloud of gas, we have a precious planet and no right to destroy it. There’s something we know for sure: if the creation of planet Earth was not the making of humanity, its destruction as we know it may well result from the impact of our actions and options. Humans’ footprint is so heavy that it’s leaving marks even in the rocks. We live in a paradox – while trying to create better health and socio-economic conditions to perpetuate our own species, we are ruining the natural habitat we depend on.

As far as global waste is concerned, the World Bank forecasts it will reach 3.4 billion tonnes by 2050, a scary 70% – jump from 2016. Plastic accounts for around 12% of the total but is one of the biggest threats to the planet’s sustainability, as it is killing ecosystems and entering our food chain. Moreover, according to the United Nations, a third of all food produced around the world every year ends up in the waste bin. That wasted food alone would be enough to do away with world hunger – that affects 821 million people globally – four times over.

Being sustainable, or living up to be a responsible business, is less and less a voluntary movement to be more and more a means of “avoiding  the worst”.

A change is needed – a structural one. If the most pessimistic predictions for the near future – in terms of degradation of the environment and the ecosystems, coupled with the forecasts for a rampant growth of the world population – are correct, then the concept of “sustainability” itself is under transformation. Being sustainable, or living up to be a responsible business, is less and less a voluntary movement to be more and more a means of “avoiding the worst”.

In the Jerónimo Martins Group, we firmly believe we can – together with countries, businesses, organizations and consumers – reverse the trend. And that starts by avoiding all forms of waste. It was with this is mind that we decided to dedicate this edition of Feed to the theme of WASTE. If we do not use the Earth’s resources in a more efficient and sustainable way, we will be guilty of not leaving a better world for our children – and our children’s children – to live in. And that’s a WASTE.

assinatura-sr-pedro-santos
Pedro Soares dos Santos,
Chairman of the Jerónimo Martins Group
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