Older but not Overlooked

Older but not Overlooked

In the last few years, many companies started to look at ageing people as a both economic challenge and a business opportunity.

In the last few years, with the growing aging of the population, many companies started to look to ageing people as a both economic challenge and a business opportunity. Nowadays, the senior market is undoubtedly booming and the opportunities are plentiful. Learn here about some activities focus on this growing segment of the market in the areas of health, education, food and sport.

 

Investing in Vision

As we age, our vision gradually deteriorates, and so the number of stores with vision-related products – frames, progressive lenses or contact lenses – has been increasing over the last few years. And not only are older people a more discerning public, but they easily remains loyal to the services of specific boutiques.

Simultaneously, there is an increasing number of more senior consumers who keep up with the latest fashion trends, which further boosts the opportunity for growth in this sector.

Illustration of glasses

Education for Seniors

Within these trends that support older, but still active members of the population, seeking to improve their quality of life. With the increase in the number of senior citizens, there has been an increase in the number of local and nationwide programmes supporting and fostering learning and education for seniors.

This is not only an opportunity to return to university or to attend for the first time, or to ponder over a subject they had always wanted to study, but learning at an older age is always beneficial for the brain and helps to sharpen the memory. At the same time, learning is a social activity, which contributes towards creating human liaisons which counteract human isolation – something that mostly affects this age bracket.

Illustration of old man with glasses

Sports Devised for Seniors

It’s a sign of the times. The progressive ageing of the world population and the low birth rates in developed countries have given rise to a trend that is increasingly in vogue: sport for the elderly. We’re not just talking about the most common activities, such as hydrogymnastics or fitness for senior citizens.

Badminton, dance, table tennis, yoga or tai chi are now part of older people’s sports glossary. A quick Google search is enough to realise the investment that has been made in this area. Objective? To improve the quality of life of a section of the population that is on the rise. There are proven benefits: improved brain activity, and better physical and psychological health.

Illustration of old man doing yoga

Bringing Proximity to Seniors

The ageing population has been shaping the scenario of food retail all around the western world. On the one hand, one of the positive effects of this population trend is the rebirth of local commerce, leading the major distribution chains to start opening street stores, right in the heart of urban neighbourhoods.

On the other hand, there has been a growing concern with regard to adapting packaging and tailoring portions and servings, specifically offering options for buying individual or loose items, which encourages savings and avoids waste. There are also growth opportunities in offering health-related products that are practical and functional – blood pressure or temperature monitors, or mobility training equipment – and healthy food.

Illustration of a house

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